topBlue

Date: Monday 7 August
Time: 11.10am-12.40pm
Room: Mezzanine M3

Chairs:
David Bunker Executive Director Queensland Genomic Alliance
Dr Blanca Gallego Luxan Lead Health Analytics Lab, AIHI, Macquarie University

Speakers:
Dana Bradford Senior Research Scientist, Australian eHealth Research Centre, CSIRO
A/Prof Marcel Dinger CEO Genome.One
Nic Waddell Head of Medical Genomics QIMR Berghofer

Precision medicine – trends and applications

Learning Objectives:
Precision medicine refers to the customisation of healthcare that takes into account individual variability in health status, genes, lifestyle, and environment. In this workshop, we will discuss new ways in which Health Informatics is being used to deliver precision medicine, including: information technology to build a sharable precision medicine knowledge base, advance analytics methods for biomarker discovery and translation, and information systems that help transform knowledge into action.

The workshop has been divided into two sessions dealing with the acquisition of knowledge and its translation into practice. At the end of each session participants and speakers will be asked to share their opinions and experiences in a roundtable discussion with the objective of identifying the key gaps and priorities for the delivery of precision medicine in Australia. At the end of the conference these take-home messages will be compiled and provided to HISA in the form of a research agenda for precision medicine informatics.

Target Audience:
Clinicians, software developers, informaticians and entrepreneurs, with an interest to contribute to the future of precision medicine informatics in Australia.

topBlue

Date: Monday 7 August
Time: 11.10am-5.30pm
Room: Mezzanine Level Room # 4

Chair:
Dr Brendan Lovelock

Speakers:
Prof Vishaal Kishore Innovation & Public Policy, RMIT University
Ann Larkins ‎Executive Director Information Development, Alfred Health
Chris Kommatas Innovation Manager & Accelerator Program Director, Melbourne Health
Michael Draheim CIO, Metro South Brisbane HHS
Dr Fernando Carbonieri and Gib de Medeiros Hacking Health
Dean Pribetic Director, Method
Peter Bodon
Ian Gibson
Martin Moszczynski ‎CEO & Co-Founder, Olinqua

SPONSORED BY
 

Digital Hospital Transformation Forum

Bridges and Barriers to Transformation: Opportunities for Digitally Driven Innovation in our Hospitals

We are all familiar with the unrelenting pressures driving our hospitals to evolve and transform themselves. This process of transformation is underpinned by a facility’s ability to productively innovate, to leverage the skills and resources within the facility as well as to bring in external capabilities. Within our hospitals, the availability of data, both mobile and fixed is becoming a powerful and growing force for innovation. The progressive digitisation of even our modest facilities is throwing up opportunities to significantly transform the way our hospitals operate.

But are we able to capture these opportunities?

This forum is focused on how we have captured the opportunities to innovate, what were the barriers that we encountered, and bridges we built to enable success. It will consider the influence of the gap that has evolved between the well-developed clinical process innovation and technology innovation communities. We will discuss the innovation processes that have been used and how they could be improved.

Above all, this discussion will be about sharing our innovation experiences in a way that we can sustainably learn from each other and better guide our organisations to success.

Target Audience
The forum is aimed at bringing together a multidisciplinary audience of Clinicians, CXO’s, informaticians and technologists to grapple with the issues around enhancing our approach to innovation in healthcare. A keen interest in improving the transformation of our hospitals is the primary requirement for getting the most out of this forum.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand the strengths and weaknesses of the major innovation models that have been used in the hospital environment
  • Obtain an understanding of some of the new innovation tools that are used to build an innovation program
  • Gain an appreciation of how innovation programs can be can be implemented
  • Build a build a broader and more cohesive hospital innovation community in Australia that is more connected to the international innovation communities.

topBlue

Date: Monday 7 August
Time: 1.50-3.20pm
Room: Mezzanine M3

Chair:
Dr Mark Santamaria

Speakers:
Dr Clair Sullivan and Dr Andrew Staib Princess Alexandra Hospital Brisbane
Jackie McLeod and Adrian Hutchinson Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne
Dr Louise Schaper HISA
Dr Carl Kuschel The Royal Women’s Hospital
Dr Mark Merolli Swinburne University
A/Prof Liz Cummings University of Tasmania
Dr George Margelis
Michael Hosking Orion Health

CXIOs are the new rock stars

In the US and the UK Professor Robert Wachter wants clinical digital leaders in health and social care to be rock stars – in this session we will hear from Australian clinical informatics leaders. Join us for a great discussion on the emerging role of CXIOs and energising the professional world of health and clinical informatics.

Workshop Format
This interactive workshop is divided into 3 segments:

  1. The CXIO experience of an EMR implementation
  2. Reflections on clinical informatics and the CXIO role
    In the words of Dr Tony Sara FRACMA (2011): “The state of play for clinical informatics in Australia is not optimum – there are a handful of doctors who do it full-time, and a much larger number who do so part-time. There are no training positions, and few tertiary courses. What I find the most gratifying as a doctor in this field, is the capacity to improve the care that large numbers of patients receive, and from a “life satisfaction” perspective, problem-solve with my colleagues how we will practice medicine tomorrow.”Irrespective of the systems in use in the workplace, clinicians need to be engaged in clinical informatics. At the core of clinical informatics is the desire to take better care of patients. In doing so we need to:

    • Assess and inform the information needs of clinicians, managers and patients and
    • Characterise, evaluate and improve clinical processes
  3. The Australian CXIO experience
    The role of the CXIO varies across Australia but also between institutions. The preliminary results of a brief survey of current and aspiring CXIOs will be presented with discussion on how this data can be used to best support CXIOs in Australia and to guide the activities of the clinical informatics network.

Target Audience

  • CCIOs, CMIOs, CNIOs and other CXIOs
  • Clinicians in leadership roles– Medical, Nursing and Allied Health
  • Health Informaticians
  • Public and private sector board members
  • Primary Health Networks
  • Community-based organisations

topBlue

Date: Monday 7 August
Time: 1.50-3.20pm
Room: Plaza Level Room #5

SPEAKERS:
Steve Nahuysen National Healthcare Manager, Data#3
Nathan Wittke Manager, Strategic Partners and Industries, End User Computing, VMWare Australia
David Lennon Managing Partner Business Aspect
Janet Brimson Partner for Information and Analytics, Business Aspect
Andrew Fox Director, Business Mobility and End User Computing, VMWare ANZ

SPONSORED BY

Digital Transformation

Digital transformation is everywhere in healthcare. From creating and sharing digital patient records, connecting biomedical devices and wearables through the Internet of Things right through to maintaining safe work environments for healthcare workers with IP-based camera networks. The amount of data gathered to help better decision-making is increasing exponentially. One of the primary drivers for this digital transformation is to improve healthcare outcomes. But this digital revolution is of little use to the healthcare practitioners that rely on these new systems if they can’t easily get instant and secure access whenever they need it.

Based on Virtual Desktop Infrastructure, The Anywhere Clinical Desktop can utilise low cost terminals placed around the hospital close to the patient or even via mobile units. Clinicians simply tap their access card on the terminal to access their desktop with no need to remember user names and passwords.

Date: Monday 7 August
Time: 1.50-3.20pm
Room:
Plaza Level Room 5

Workshop

…in development. Stay tuned.

Date: Tuesday 8 August
Time: 11.10am-12.40pm
Room: Mezzanine M2

Speaker:
Dr Steve Leicester Head of eheadspace, headspace

Focus on mental health – linking primary and community care

eheadspace is delivering tailored mental health supports and treatments via 1:1 interactions to young people and families across Australia. During 2016 our highly skilled clinicians supported over 33,000 young people with over 90,000 occasions of service. The service model clearly has significant public appeal, however as long as we continue to primarily deliver 1:1 treatments, our challenges with addressing service demand will only worsen. The task ahead of us involves creatively addressing service demand by broadening our digital services, whilst continuing to deliver safe, accessible and effective youth mental health treatment. A key part of the session will involve reviewing what we consider treatment can be and reflecting on what the new role of service providers could be.

Target Audience
Health service managers; digital & web design specialist; mental health practitioners; health policy advisers.
Anyone with an interest in delivering mental health supports

Learning Objectives

  • Improving methods to address service demand
  • Utilising digital mediums as front line services for mental health
  • Improving ways of enhancing protective factors for mental health – connectedness & purpose

topBlue

Date: Tuesday 8 August
Time: 11.10am-12.40pm
Room: Mezzanine M3

Chair:
Emma Hossack President, MSIA

Speaker:
Tom Bowden Director/Industry Relationships, HealthLink
Dr Andrew McIntrye Technical Director, Medical-Objects
Dr Frank Pyefinch Owner, BP Software
Peter Young Consultant

Secure messaging/interoperability

Interoperability of health software is considered the answer to most digital health issues. It affects all levels of care and has been highlighted as the cause of health not keeping up with other industries.

Secure messaging delivery interoperability was one of the key recommendations of the Royle Report.
This Masterclass will highlight the issues impeding interoperability across medical software, suggest some ways forward and the status of the SMD project for interoperability with industry and ADHA.

topBlue

Date: Tuesday 8 August
Time: 11.10am-12.40pm
Room:
Mezzanine Level Room # 4

Chair:
Dr Louise Schaper CEO, HISA

Speakers:
Di Millen Health Informatics Leadership, Professionalism and Workforce Specialist (UK)
NIgel Chartres Advisor, HISA

Building digital health workforce capability

How do we prepare a 21st century healthcare workforce to deliver a 21st century healthcare system?

Across the health workforce, there is a clear and demonstrable need for health informatics knowledge and digital health skills. As our health system embraces the digital age, all aspects of the healthcare workforce – clinicians, health information managers, C-suite executives including Board Directors, business analysts, project managers, technologists etc –need some level of health informatics knowledge in order to do their jobs in the 21st century healthcare system.

Additionally, in a trend that is international, Australia needs more specialist health informaticians across the sector.

This workshop is your opportunity to input into HISA’s workforce and professional development planning and initiatives. We have ongoing programs and more in the pipeline – all designed to help prepare and build the 21st century healthcare workforce as healthcare business models, models of care and workforces evolve. We want to hear from you – to discuss current and future career opportunities, the needs and challenges you are facing, and how we can grow together.

topBlue

Date: Tuesday 8 August
Time: 11.10am-12.40pm
Room: Plaza Level Room 5

Chairs:
Dr John Zelcer

Speakers:
Tony Abbenante Committee Member, Cybersecurity CoP
David Bunker Committee Member, Cybersecurity CoP
Dr Damian Claydon-Platt Committee Member, Cybersecurity CoP
Mark Sabotti Director of Healthcare and Life Scientes, Asia Pacific Unisys
Prof Trish Williams Committee Member, Cybersecurity CoP

SPONSORED BY

HISA’s Cybersecurity Community of Practice

In 2017, cybersecurity continues to grow as one of the key challenges for digital health in today’s hospital and healthcare system. There is no doubt the threat to patient records, safety and security is real and requires resourcing.

Connectivity and automated processes may help with workflow but they have also increased the vulnerability of healthcare providers to cybersecurity breaches. While cybersecurity may be perceived as primarily a technical matter it is much broader than this and encompasses both technology and human processes.

The disruption caused by cybersecurity incidents can have far-reaching effects:

  • lack of access to critical clinical information and services,
  • costly replacement of equipment and data,
  • loss of community confidence in our healthcare system and importantly
  • reputational damage to the providers and organisations that suffer a breach.

To complement the activity and publicity surrounding cybersecurity in healthcare, HISA has established a Cybersecurity Community of Practice (CoP) to inform, engage and influence in the context of cybersecurity in healthcare and the application of sound health cybersecurity practice.

Workshop Learning Objective

This interactive workshop will allow participants to understand the current and planned activities of the HISA Cybersecurity CoP, hear from cybersecurity experts regarding cyber risk mitigation strategies, understand key aspects of best practices in cybersecurity governance, and contribute ideas to help guide the activities of the CoP over the next 12 months.

Target Audience

  • Hospital CXOs
  • CMIOs and CNIOs
  • Clinicians – Medical, Nursing and Allied Health
  • Health Informaticians
  • Health ICT specialists
  • Vendors – large and small
  • Public and private sector board members
  • Cybersecurity experts – practitioners and consultants
  • Healthcare consumers

Digital Health

Date: Tuesday 8 August
Time: 1.50-3.20pm
Room: Mezzanine M2

Chair:
Greg Moran Business Development and Innovation, HISA

SPEAKERS:
Simon Terry Chairman and Owner, Change Agents Worldwide
Dr Kaveh Safavi Senior Managing Director, Health Industry, Accenture Health (USA)
Ian Manovel Innovation Principal Director, Accenture
Prof Vishaal Kishore Innovation & Public Policy
RMIT University

Innovating Health – Bringing it together

HISA’s Innovating Health Series outcomes will be presented: “Creating a New Conversation.”

Key priorities on health system innovation will be debated and discussed.

Session is targeted to health executives, industry leaders, policy makers and change agents.

How can we contribute to innovation and health system change?

HISA is pleased to partner with Accenture on the Innovating Health thought leadership series.

Session will be limited in number and by invitation to HIC delegates.

topBlue

Date: Tuesday 8 August
Time: 1.50-3.20pm
Room: Mezzanine M3

Chair:
A/Prof Chris Bain

SPEAKERS:
A/Prof Chris Bain Chair, HISA’s UX Community of Practice
Matiu Bush Design Integration Lead, RSL Care and RDNS
Pamela Scicluna Executive Director, Kianza
Dr Louise Teo Medical Registrar, Basic Physician Trainee, Founder, TheMedicalStartup.com
Bernard Schokman UX Strategist, BernardSchokman.com and UXMoshpit.com
Dr Anne Miller Human Factors Specialist, eHealth NSW

HIC UX Workshop

Usability and User Experience (UX) – stories from the front lines

In recent years there has been a groundswell of dissatisfaction around clinical information systems (CIS’) from medical practitioners and other healthcare practitioners (HCPs), especially from those based in the US and the UK. This is despite various pieces of evidence pertaining to the benefits of CIS’ to clinical care – for example the surveys of several thousand US physicians referred to by King et al (King et al, 2013) which showed that nearly 80% (so a substantial majority) of surveyed physicians “reported (that) EHR use enhanced patient care overall”. In addition they found that up to 50 percent of physicians reported that “EHR use was associated with clinical benefits related to providing recommended care, ordering appropriate tests, and facilitating patient communication”.

The issue of good usability of systems and how to achieve it (and good UX), of course extends far beyond its application to EMRs …. and into any software we use in healthcare – from smart pumps to apps to clinical decision support systems.

In this brief workshop we will examine the constructs of usability and user experience (UX) and what constitutes good UX and usability. We will consider – through the experience of key experts with real world experience- what usability and UX problems look like on the ground (what are their symptoms ?) and how they can be addressed.

Learning Objectives

We want participants to walk away with an understanding of:

  • What are UX and usability?
  • What problems are disciplines like UX design and usability engineering trying to solve and how do these disciplines solve these problems?
  • What do these problems look like in front line healthcare – how can you recognise them?
  • Why are these problems important – who cares?
  • What is some useful knowledge in this space that participants can apply back in their workplaces?

Target Audience

  • Clinical staff
  • Software developers
  • Usability and UX professionals
  • Operational managers
  • HIM’s
  • Informaticians

topBlue

Date: Tuesday 8 August
Time: 1.50-3.20pm
Room: Mezzanine M4

Chairs:
Prof Trish Williams and Dr John Zelcer

Applying the HISA E-Safety Guidelines

When designed, implemented and used appropriately, e-health can be a positive enabler of safety, quality, effectiveness and productivity in healthcare delivery.

However, some concerns have emerged about harm associated with the use of e-health systems and applications both in Australia and internationally, as the technologies concerned are increasingly complex and operate in complex socio-technical environments. Accordingly, there is potential for unintended or unexpected consequences. A HISA working group was formed and has worked over the past 24 months to develop Professional Practice Guidelines to address this important issue.

The specific objectives of these Professional Practice Guidelines are to ensure that:

  • Potential hazards associated with clinical information systems are prospectively identified throughout the system life cycle and that potential risks are mitigated.
  • Hazardous situations that do eventuate are quickly identified and associated harm is minimised.
  • The health and e-health supply industries systemically improve Australian safety.

The Assuring Patient Safety in Relation to E-Health Systems and Applications, Professional Practice Guidelines, known as the “E-safety guidelines”, are now released for trial implementation.

These professional practice guidelines are the first publication of this work specifically tailored for the Australian e-health sector.

The guidelines are being released as “Draft for Trial Implementation” initially, as it is important to acknowledge that patient safety in relation to e-health systems is a topic that continues to evolve, with a growing evidence base and emerging best practices being applied in a number of countries and jurisdictions.

It is anticipated that these draft professional practice guidelines will therefore also mature and evolve in keeping with the expansion of the body of relevant knowledge and experience.

Learning Objective
This interactive workshop will allow participants to understand the intention, framing, components and sources of the guidelines, to help identify areas for further development, and to understand how to potentially apply the guidelines in their specific individual or organizational context.

Target Audience

  • Hospital CXOs
  • CMIOs and CNIOs
  • Clinicians – Medical, Nursing and Allied Health
  • Health Informaticians
  • Health ICT specialists
  • Vendors
  • Healthcare consumers